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Hydrogen Vehicles

General Motors has launched a test program using 100 HydroGen4 hydrogen vehicles in the United States, Japan, Korea, China, and Germany. U.S. drivers have driven the cars over 435,000 miles. The vehicles shown below have a 1.8 kWh buffer battery to store energy from the vehicle’s regenerative braking system and cover peak electrical loads. The tanks hold 4.2 kg of hydrogen for an operating range of up to 200 miles.

Photo
Complements GM http://www.greencarcongress.com/2008/11/opel-presents-f.html

Automakers need to make 105 million electric vehicles: 68 million passenger cars, 35 million SUV & pickups and 1.6 million heavy vehicles. Hydrogen vehicles could become available in 2010 and increase to 14.4 million hydrogen vehicles per year by 2020.

Passenger cars would use about 260 kilograms of hydrogen per year. Assuming 300 kilograms for SUV and pickups and 2,000 kilograms for heavy vehicles, 30 million metric tons of hydrogen are needed compared to the 50 million metric tons that are being produced. Hydrogen would be available at hydrogen service stations. At $2.70 per kilogram, the passenger car could travel 200 miles for about $11.00 or about $850 per year.

Although the vehicle prices haven’t been made public. If the cost was $20,000 plus for passenger cars,  $30,000 plus for SUV & Pickups and $500,000 plus for Heavy vehicles, annual vehicle sales are estimated to be over $1trillion by 2020.

Infrastructure improvements include building 33,000 hydrogen service stations to supply hydrogen. At $1 million per location, the estimated cost would be $33 billion. General Motors has estimated 12,000 hydrogen service stations could supply seventy-five percent of the motor vehicles.

 

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